The Story: Jackson, TN

You may have arrived here from Facebook www.facebook.com/JacksonStories so some of the stories here might be familiar to you. On this web site the images and videos are larger and easier for you to find. We will still put a preview of the story on Facebook but we think this is a better platform for you to experience the stories.

There’s a tab bar across the red area. Each tab is a topic, click on the top tab and it explains the topic. Then click on the tabs that drop down from the topic. Each one is a story.

You can comment on anything on the site, or talk about what’s not on the site that ought to be. Make a suggestion, let us know you have a picture or movie or idea… anything. If you’re more comfortable commenting on Facebook comment there.

We hope www.jackson-tn.com will be a place you come often.

John Reitzammer

New Bridge Bio Films

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31 Responses to The Story: Jackson, TN

  1. Mary Christie (Mary Frances Summer, JHS 1959) says:

    This is great! Thank you!

  2. Roxanna idoni says:

    Hello,
    I work for a production company currently working on a show for the Travel Channel. Your website has up a photo of Isacc Tigrett I, on the Board of Trustees. Its on this page: http://www.jackson-tn.com/organizations/181-2/

    Is this something jackson-tn.com owns and would let us use on our show ?

    Thank so much for you time.
    kind Regards,

    Roxanna Idoni
    Cheri Sundae Productions / Clearance Supervisor
    Work: 818-333-8120 / Fax: 818-333-5482
    2401 West Olive Ave / Suite 100 / Burbank, CA 91506

    • John says:

      The publication was not copyrighted, and obviously was never renewed so the image is public domain. I’ll send you a raw file of the image that will be suitable for network television broadcast standards.

      🙂

  3. Jimmy Arnold says:

    Does anyone remember the hobby store that was located between Allen and Lane on Royal ?

    • ray harness says:

      My mom would drive me out there about twice a year to purchase model planes or ships. Don’t know who the owner was but it was a wonderful place to go. Also, do you remember that the drugstore on Highland also carried models? Name was Lehnnings (sp?)

      • JOHN PARKER says:

        Lehning’s was right. It was right across the street from Alexander School! Building is still there, now a pawn shop!

        • Robin Brown says:

          When my family moved into this part of town in 1967 Lehning’s still had a functioning soda fountain. My sisters and I were allowed to walk there to buy candy and comic books. Later a Qmart opened maybe a block away and that was our destination. I think the Qmart replaced a little grocery store.

        • Mary Frances Christie says:

          When Lehning’s was going out of business, they had a huge sale on their model airplane kits. My husband and Billy Montgomery were fishing buddies who also shared the model airplane hobby. Together they bought a lot of kits, splitting the cost. My first date with Jack Christie was partially spent at Billy’s house, with the two of them divvying up their bounty. I believe there may be a kit or two in our garage, never opened!

          • John says:

            I have a hope that someday I will find one of the Emory board sand paper sticks in a model plane box with The Hobby Center printed on it. It was my dad’s hobby business he started in 1956.

  4. Linda J. Higgins, Madison Co. Historian says:

    Mine and Scott Parish’s pictorial history book titled Madison County is full of pictures from the earliest 20th century emphasizing industrial and business development in Mad. Co. and it goes through the industrial development of P & G coming here about 1969. It covers the railroads in the first chapter, Bemis in the second chapter, the rest of the bus. and industrial development in the third chapter, outstanding women in business and services in the 4th chapter, and the last chapter pictures the development of the communities, schools, sports, tourism and famous people who visited Madison Co. You can still buy this book at SAMs, Walgreens Bemis, and Amazon.

  5. Bill Hendrix says:

    I know Ray is too young to remember the Hobby shop, but Jimmy for sure is old enough to remember. Just joking Ray about your age. It was across the street from Coleman Field and do you remember the huge ditch that was behind the hobby shop? I believe it had the best crop of kudzu in Jackson. I also just read the article of Mr. Pechonick by Steve Hamilton. A very nice tribute by Steve about one of our teacher/coach that had a positive impact on our education and development. Thanks Steve

  6. Vance Roy says:

    What a great site! Found it through the Steve Hamilton piece on John Pechonik. Several years ago, I tried to contact his son in FL to see if there was a way to honor his dad. Never heard. Anyone know?

    • John Pechonick, Jr. says:

      I was not aware of the web site dedicated to my dad until yesterday. Jun/19th/2013

      Union is currently in the process of digitizing about 100
      items to be placed in their archive. The archive is open
      open to the public.

      J. Pechonick Jr.

  7. Ronnie Long says:

    One of my many memories of Jackson years gone by, was the little candy maker next to West Jackson Eleamentry School. I remember getting a bag of candy for just 3 cents. Some of the best hard candy ever…..

    • Dr. Ken Flippo says:

      The candy shop was owned by Mr. and Mrs. Simpson. They made the candies in the basement of their home and sold it to the smaller neighborhood stores in the city. Their son delivered their candy to the stores.
      They would give it to the kids in the neighborhood for free. You could always tell the days they were working because the air would smell like peppermint and vanilla all around their block.

    • Diana Stankus says:

      My brother and I went to West Jackson Elementary School, too. That little candy store is one of our favorite memories of growing up in Jackson. We would buy little paper bags full of broken peppermint and horehound candy for 2 or 3 cents.

  8. Claude Ray Wilson says:

    A message to John: I carried the Jackson Sun in ’57-’58, and we would go across the street to “The Letter Shop” and buy gimp from your mom and dad. I’m guessing that was the predecessor to the Hobby Shop ! Like this site John, keep it going ! Ray

  9. deana settlemyre says:

    I’m looking for coworkers of Paul Peters from 1965-1978. Contact me at dsettlemyre@rpwb.com; 888-293-6883 (ext. 6525). Deana Settlemyre

  10. Lehnings Drug Store was a favorite treat during elementary school days. You could pick out ten different candies or gum for a dime!

    • Edwin Boyd ('50) says:

      I lived on Campbell and went to West Jackson Elementary AND also bought candy and I thought it was only 2 cents…ha.
      This is a great site!

  11. The woman to the right of Nancy Dunn is Florence Weatherly. You’ve labeled all the other people I know!

  12. j b law says:

    What was the name of the drug store on the corner of Highland and I believe Lafayette, I thought it was West Drugs but can’t find any info. about it.

  13. Randy Winbush says:

    Standard Drug Co was at Highland and Lafsyette.
    West Drug Store was in Bemis.

  14. Betty Pulliam Keen says:

    Love this site!! I well remember the Simpson’s candy store!

  15. Barbara Hinton Farmer says:

    I have to agree with so many others that Edyth Worthy was my favorite!! I was anything but athletic and she never critized me or mad me feel I couldn’t do something! She remains a friend to this day!!
    My next favorite was Elizabeth Etheridge. I loved her class especially when she came in and begin talking about anything but Spanish and talked the entire period about an unrelated subject!
    Such good memories of Jackson High School!!

  16. j b law says:

    I am trying to remember the church H. O. Forgy formed in Jackson does anyone have info. on it.

  17. Dr. Jim Bryant says:

    Feb 17,2015

    Does anyone remember the old Black man named “Uncle Joe” that ran a BBQ joint from his back yard? He Lived across the street from Whitehall Elementary School. His joint was the first place I ever ate BBQ, delicious.

    Check out my recent book “Run for Glory” about Jackson High (1959) and Union University (1963)
    See 1959 JHS Golden Bears football team at reunion June 5/6 in Jackson

    PS I lived in the little grey house behind Simpson’s Candy Shop and next to West Jackson Elementary. Spent lots of my youth in his shop “watching”

    • John says:

      I also remember an Uncle Joe’s on the North side of Preston, I think in Faris and Stonewall about 1950.

    • Hunter Steadman says:

      Great old time bbq joint with screened in area where you ordered. I think they had tables but we always got to go. Grease stains on paper sack let you now it was good. My grandmother, Mrs R E Guy(Hattie Myrtle) would send us to pick up bbq for lunch.

  18. Dr. Jim Bryant says:

    Jackson High School 1956-59

    “Run for Glory” at
    http://www.amazon.com/author/dr.jimbryant

    sportsF5@windstream.net

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